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ABOUT THIS COLLECTION  

These navy-and-white snowflake graphics illustrated a book called “Snowflakes: a Chapter from the Book of Nature” (1863).  Edited by Israel Perkins Warren and published by the evangelical American Tract Society, the book does not explore any scientific research, but presents a collection of republished poems, anecdotes and other writing about snow and the snowflake from a religious perspective. The authors celebrated snowfall as a sign of God’s mercy, genius and design. Apart from the top of the first plate, which shows the primary geometrical forms taken by snow crystals, all the other forms shown are "representations of individual crystals, actually observed and sketched with the aid of the microscope.”

 

COLLECTION DETAILS

  • Series title: Snowflakes: a Chapter from the Book of Nature
  • Series size: 8 artworks
  • Edition: Limited edition of 1000
  • Proof of Ownership: Certification on the Ethereum blockchain under the ERC1155 protocol. Each artwork is delivered privately and directly to collectors as non-fungible tokens (NFTs) that guarrante proof of ownership.
  • Format: Pieces consist of PNG files sized 2160x3840 pixels - 150 dpi.
  • Medium: Illustration
  • Artwork materials:  Illustration paper
  • Contract Address: 0x495f947276749ce646f68ac8c248420045cb7b5e
  • ID: 2749212597480566...

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

In the preface, the authors credit three illustrators whose work formed the source material for the book’s engravings. The 18th-century Dutch physician John Nettis, who used early forms of microscope lenses to make his snowflake drawings in 1755; the early-19th century Arctic explorer William Scoresby whose meticulous drawings were made on board ship in the Arctic using a microscope and published in Scoresby’s 1820 book “An Account of the Arctic Regions,” and their contemporary, British astronomer and meteorologist James Glaisher, who published detailed sketches of snow crystals under a microscope in 1855. Thirty years later, Vermont farmer Wi